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FYI


For Your Information

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FYI


For Your Information

On this page you will find all kinds of information about various items, parlor mascots, etc.

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Wet Specimen Care


Wet Specimen Care


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WET SPECIMEN INFO & CARE TIPS

  • NONE of the specimens were specifically removed from nature or killed for the purpose of becoming a wet specimen.  As crude as it may sound they were considered waste (zoo, pet, food, farm or scientific) and would otherwise be thrown out with the trash.  
  • The wet specimens that I obtain are from some of the best sources in the business.  They are not hobbyists, they are professionals that have studied and tested many methods of specimen preservation.  They have many years of experience in preserving specimens, most are licensed taxidermists.
  • There are a couple of different methods for wet specimen preservation but I buy from sources that follow the US Department of the Interior's guidelines for museum and scientific preservation.  
  • At a high level they are preserved and fixed with Formalin and stored in 70% isopropyl alcohol.  This means that the specimen's muscle tissue is set so it's not advisable to remove the specimen from the original container unless it's necessary.
  • Specimens are nontoxic unless ingested, and free of any harmful biological or chemical material.
  • Keep the container lid sealed tightly. 
  • Over time the alcohol that the specimen is stored in will begin to evaporate, you will need to refill the container with more 70% alcohol (which can be obtained at any local pharmacy for around $3).  NOTE: It's not advisable to change from 70% to 90% alcohol.
  • It's possible that over time the alcohol could get slightly cloudy or discolored.  If that is the case, simply dispose of the current liquid and refill with 70% isopropyl alcohol.
  • As a precautionary measure, ensure that your wet specimen is not stored in direct sunlight or extreme heat.